Presentations

Please submit a 250 word abstract by the 1st of March 2017. Your submission should addressing one/or more of the following questions in order to illuminate the main concern with the critical capabilities of contemporary social science.

You are invited, not to reinvent the wheel or conduct a whole new set of work, so much as to take this opportune political moment to engage with your research/work as it is. In doing so to focus on its inherent politicality, and thus its critical presence and capabilities in the world and its coming future, as part of social science.

Submissions willing to explore beyond the basic framework for the critical capabilities of social science as laid out below will be considered. Submissions from people in formal academia and outside it are welcome.

Please focus on your research in relation to uniquely contemporary themes in their various forms, as identified by Keynote Speaker Keith Hart, including global war, wholesale urbanisation, massive dislocation, climate change, population growth, and digital technologies.

QUESTIONS ON THE CRITICAL CAPABILITIES OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • What is the object/aim of social science?

You are invited to share one idea for what you believe the aim/object of social science is or should be (or if more relevant your discipline or area of work). This idea must also be grounded in one’s own research project. For example Keynote Speaker Keith Hart proposes our object to be ‘7+ billion people trying to live together on one planet’ and our aim ‘the making of world society’.

  • What are the methods that engage complex glocal reality?

You are invited to share one idea for what you believe the methods of social science are or should be (or if more relevant your discipline or area of work). This idea must also be grounded in one’s own research project. Methods can be considered as (i) the processes of capturing, analysing or communicating results, however they need not necessarily fit within this division of labour. For example Social Scientist Tim Ingold proposes that we conduct research ‘in correspondence’ with our research subject, (ii) the implicit political models for effecting causality or generative emergence in our research. For example Critical Theorist John Sanbonmatsu argues that intellectual trends have left us with either an instrumentalist or a baroque approach to knowledge production and calls instead for a renewed strategic and engaged critical understanding, drawing heavily on Gramsci’s political social-science as opposed to Foucault’s political conclusions.

  • What are the infrastructures of great social science?

You are invited to share one idea for what the you believe the relevant infrastructures of social science are or should be (or if more relevant your discipline or area of work). This idea must also be grounded in one’s own research project or setting. Infrastructure can be considered as the real settings and contexts that research are embedded in, whether this be various forms of (i) organisation including Universities, Research Councils, or NGOs, (ii) processes that move between objective, subjective, and intersubjective scales such as funding, authority, or auditing, (iii) strategy including competing for resources, activism, awareness campaigning, lobbying, or advising, (iv) communication including journal articles, journalism, public intellectual, protest, online following.

Format:

Presenters will need to first present their idea in either an 8 minute or 20 minute slot. They will share a panel with presenters on either a similar theme (as mentioned above) or the same critical question (above). Presenters will then also need to be ready to hold their idea and participate in deeper group discussions for up to 45 minutes. Submissions proposing other formats will be considered.

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